Monday
Aug312015

The Key Update, Volume 12, Number 1 - July 2015

Two Recent Webinars Hosted by the Clearinghouse Are Available Online!

Two recent Clearinghouse webinars – on early intervention in psychosis services and on criminal justice issues, respectively – are now available online! In “Peer Leadership in Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) Services: From Program Development to Outcome Evaluation,” the presenters discussed both the real-world challenges of robust peer involvement and the potential for such involvement to transform – rather than merely augment – services across the domains of planning, service delivery, policy, and evaluation. The topics covered in “How Do We Create a Truly Just Criminal Justice System for Everyone, Including Individuals with Mental Health Conditions?” include the movement for social justice whose goal is to cut the incarceration rate in half by 2030 while reducing crime; how to support individuals with mental health conditions who are incarcerated and how to help them transition successfully into the community; and diversion models to prevent or minimize incarceration. “Peer Leadership in Early Intervention in Psychosis Services” is available here; “How Do We Create a Truly Just Criminal Justice System for Everyone…” is available here.
 

Join the March for Dignity and Change in Mental Health on August 24, 2015, in DC!
 
Destination Dignity is organizing a march for the dignity and human rights of individuals with mental health conditions. Among its demands are to safeguard the human rights of individuals with mental health conditions, to promote their valued place in the community, and to ensure that they receive the right kind of help when and where they need it and want it. “The Destination Dignity March will bring together people from around the nation and the world, with individuals affected by mental health conditions in the lead, to create energy and solidarity for a more supportive nation,” the organizers say. It will begin with a kick-off rally at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, 400 New Jersey Avenue NW, at 11 a.m., followed by a march on the National Mall, gathering at noon at 3rd Street and Madison Drive NW. For more information: Facebook.com/MHDignityMarch, @MHDignityMarch, #MHDignityMarch, www.DestinationDignity.org. Questions? Writedignitymarch@mentalhealthsf.org
 

GAINS Center to Host Two Webinars on Successful Use of Peer Support in State Prisons
 
SAMHSA’s GAINS Center and the Association of State Correctional Administrators are hosting a two-part webinar series focusing on peer support in state correctional facilities: “Attendees will learn about the innovative use of peers and successful collaborations between correctional facilities and peer-operated programs in providing a wide array of reentry services. The first webinar will highlight three exemplary programs and the second will focus on how to develop, implement, fund, sustain and expand these programs in state correctional facilities.” Part I will be held on August 20, 2015; Part 2 will take place on Sept. 11, 2015. Both 90-minute webinars will begin at 3 p.m. ET. For more information and to register, click here.
 

Summer Recovery to Practice (RTP) Webinar Series Begins Today!
 
SAMHSA is offering a series of 12 webinars, from July 27 through September 3, which will make Recovery To Practice – a SAMHSA initiative that “supports the expansion and integration of recovery-oriented care delivered by mental health providers” – accessible to all behavioral and general health practitioners working in multidisciplinary and integrated practice settings. All events will be held from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET, and all will be recorded for future access. For the dates and topics and/or to register, click here.
 
 
A Webinar on “Improving Health through Trauma-Informed Care” Will Take Place Tomorrow!
 
On July 28, 2015, at 2 p.m. ET, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is sponsoring a webinar, targeted at treatment providers, on “Improving Health Through Trauma-Informed Care.” “How can you embed trauma-informed approaches into the practice of your integrated primary care clinic?” SAMHSA writes. “Join this webinar to walk through what a trauma-informed clinic looks like and simple steps you can take to ensure your services and clinic environment are trauma-informed.” Among the presenters are Leah Harris, trauma-informed care specialist and coordinator of consumer affairs for the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors, and Mary Blake, public health advisor at  SAMHSA. To register and for more information, including SAMHSA’s primer on trauma-informed care, click here.



NEC to Sponsor Webinar on Evaluation of Peer Programs on August 5
 
A 90-minute webinar presented by the National Empowerment Center on “We Are the Evidence: Evaluation of Peer Programs” will take place on August 5, 2015, at 2 p.m. ET.  The presenters are Jean Campbell, PhD, who helped establish Consumer-Operated Service Programs (COSPs) as evidence-based practices; Laysha Ostrow, PhD, of Live and Learn; and Bevin Croft, MPP, of Human Services Research Institute (HSRI). The webinar will stress the importance of good evaluation of peer programs, offer helpful tips, and use peer respites as a case study.  Click here to register.
 
 
Videos Help Behavioral Health Providers to Successfully Integrate Peer Support Staff
 
Two videos and corresponding tip sheets for behavioral health providers have recently been produced by the Lewin Group in partnership with the Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Office (MMCO), which is part of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). These products describe success stories of peer support staff, and advise organizations on how they can best use peer support staff to improve their care delivery. For the videos, click here and here. If you have any questions, please contact brigit.kyei-baffour@lewin.com, 703-269-5762.
 

“Our Stories, Our Lives” Seeks Stories about What Helps and What Hurts Recovery

Recovery Now! – composed of people in recovery, advocates, family members of individuals with mental health conditions, and concerned community members – is looking for stories about what helped people recover and what set them back in their recovery journey. “Far too often, people with mental health and substance use conditions are portrayed in negative ways in the media, which contributes to stereotypes and discrimination. The ‘Our Stories, Our Lives’ project seeks to gather and share stories of triumph and struggle from everyday people living with mental health and substance use conditions, to help shift the public perception towards recovery and hope.” To contribute your story, click here.
 

Three Surveys Are Recruiting Participants, Including Students, Other Youth, and Professionals

 
Three surveys (two in the U.S. and one in the U.K.) are recruiting participants. First, the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities is seeking to learn more about how to support students with mental health issues to help them succeed in school. “Students who enroll in the study may have a chance to work with someone who will help them to set goals related to their education, relationships, mental health and campus life, and receive encouragement and support to achieve their goals,” the researchers say. For more information, click here, contact kpizz@temple.edu or go directly to the survey byclicking here. The second survey, by the Copeland Center, involves seeking the opinions of youth between the ages of 14 and 30 for a proposed youth documentary “to be used nationally for the advancement and expansion of wellness strategies.” For the survey, which will be open until August 31, 2015, click here. For more information, write Letty Elenes at lelenes25@gmail.com. The third opportunity involves a study that is recruiting “people working or studying in the field of mental health or mental health research.” This study, entitled “Professionals’ Understanding of Mental Health Problems,” is examining how such individuals “understand mental health problems (for example, depression and anxiety).” For more information, click here.


How to Stop the Overuse of Jails for Individuals with Mental Health Conditions
 
A new white paper from Policy Research Associates “examines factors contributing to the incarceration of people with serious mental illness and approaches to reform. Redesigning financial incentives for institutions, integrating state and local requirements and opportunities, and creating a skilled and adequately sized workforce in local justice systems are identified as priority areas. The report also points to the importance of coordination among health care, community, and justice organizations to establish practices and protocols” to help individuals with mental health conditions. For more information and to download a free copy of the report – “When Political Will Is Not Enough: Jails, Communities, and Persons with Mental Health Disorders” – click here.
 
 
“Medicaid at 50: Its Impact in Your State”
 
The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) has analyzed state-by-state data on how Medicaid improves access to health care for millions of families and individuals, and has provided a map so that everyone can learn more about what Medicaid is doing in their state. For example, in California, which has the largest population of any state, 28 percent of individuals with disabilities received access to critical care through Medicaid that helped them live independently. In Wyoming, the state with the smallest population, the corresponding figure is 18 percent. CBPP, a nonpartisan research and policy institute founded in 1981, pursue[s] federal and state policies designed both to reduce poverty and inequality and to restore fiscal responsibility in equitable and effective ways. To find out the impact of Medicaid in your state, click here.
 
Thanks, Leah Harris (@LeahIda)


 
Higher Education Can Transform the Lives of Individuals with Criminal Justice Histories
 
“Higher Education and Reentry: The Gifts They Bring,” a study by researchers at CUNY Graduate Center, “considers a number of important questions: What does it take for people with criminal justice histories to successfully transform the trajectory of their lives? What are the obstacles they face? What affirmative steps can we take to make our public and private colleges and universities more welcoming to this growing population of students?” For the press release and complete document, click here. According to a report by the Bureau of Justice Statistics in 2006, “At midyear 2005…56% of State prisoners, 45% of Federal prisoners, and 64% of jail inmates” had a mental health problem. For the BJS report, click here.

Thanks, @RiversideHouse
 

Registration Is Open for Alternatives 2015!

The planning is in high gear for Alternatives 2015, the 29th annual national conference organized by and for individuals with lived experience of a mental health condition! To view an inspirational video about the goals and themes of the conference, click here. To register, click here. (The organizers, Peerlink National Technical Assistance Center, write that scholarships from SAMHSA are never guaranteed and haven't been announced yet for 2015. “We encourage everyone to utilize local partnerships, fundraising and other strategies for conference attendance. Updates regarding the availability of any scholarships with pertinent information will be posted here, and announced on Facebook and [the] Peerlink website.  We will also be posting helpful information and tools to help you in your fundraising efforts very soon!”) 

 
Report Calls for Strengthening Psychosocial Interventions for Behavioral Health Conditions

On July 15, the National Academy of Medicine released a plan to ensure that evidence-based psychosocial interventions are routinely used in clinical practice and made a part of clinical training for mental health professionals. “Psychosocial interventions are a huge component of how mental and substance use disorders are treated,” said an author of the report. “Yet they have been largely left out of health care reform. This report [“Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders”] describes how to incorporate these interventions into the mainstream, outlining how treatment decisions can be made at both a clinical and policy level, to increase the likelihood that people will receive evidence-based care.” To download a copy of the “Report in Brief,” click here. For more information, click here.

Thanks, Leah Harris (@LeahIda)
 
 
SAMHSA Offers Recovery Month Toolkit
 
National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) is a national observance held every September to educate Americans that substance use treatment and mental health services can enable those with a mental and/or substance use disorder to live a healthy and rewarding life. Each year, Recovery Month creates a toolkit to help individuals and organizations increase awareness of the power of recovery. The kit provides tips and resources for planning Recovery Month events and distributing information in communities across the nation. For the complete 2015 Recovery Month Toolkit in English, click here. For the Spanish-language version, click here.


NCD Progress Report Celebrates 25 Years of ADA, Envisions Next 25
 
In recognition of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the National Council on Disability has dedicated the 2015 edition of its annual progress report – “National Disability Policy: A Progress Report” – “to exploring how the ADA and other federal legislation has been put into practice by five specific state and local agencies….The report focuses on employment, education, health care, transportation, and housing, and demonstrates the impact of federal legislation and the critical role that disability advocates and state and local officials have played who translate the spirit and letter of the ADA and other federal legislation into practice. It also lays out NCD’s vision for the next 25 years of the ADA with specific policy recommendations.” To download the free report, click here.


Thanks, Howard Trachtman


The Semicolon Project Offers Hope to Those with Behavioral Health Conditions
 
“Thousands of people across the globe are getting semicolons tattooed on their bodies in a bid to raise awareness about mental health,” according to a UK publication. “The simple punctuation mark – used to divide sentence clauses – has been adopted by the non-profit group ‘Semicolon Project’ (www.projectsemicolon.com) to help raise awareness over depression, anxiety, self-harm and suicide. The organization hopes that persuading people to have semicolon tattoos – permanent or temporary – will help break down the stigma associated with mental illness.” To read more, click here.


Next National Technical Assistance and Networking Teleconference Will Be Held on August 17
 
On Monday, August 17, 2015 – at 1 p.m. ET, noon CT, 11 a.m. MT, 10 a.m. PT, 7 a.m. in Hawaii – the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse will host its monthly one-hour national technical assistance and networking teleconference. The call-in number is 866-906-0123; the pass code is 5037195#. If you would like to suggest an agenda item, please write to Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org with the word “Agenda” in the subject line. (The calls are held on the third Monday of the month except when that is a holiday, such as in January and February, in which case they are held on the fourth Monday.) Join us on August 17 at 1 p.m. ET! Again, the call-in number is 866-906-0123. The passcode is 5037195.

 
Consumer-Driven Services Directory

The Clearinghouse welcomes all programs in which consumers play a significant role in leadership and operation to apply for inclusion in its Directory of Consumer-Driven Services. The directory, accessible athttp://www.cdsdirectory.org, is searchable by location, type of organization, and targeted clientele, and serves as a free resource for consumers, program administrators and researchers. Apply online athttp://www.cdsdirectory.org/database/cds.php, via fax at 215-636-6312, or by phone at 800-553-4KEY (4539). To receive an application by mail, write to info@cdsdirectory.org or NMHCSH Clearinghouse, 1211 Chestnut Street, Suite 1100, Philadelphia, PA 19107.


About The Key Update

The Key Update is the free monthly e-newsletter of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse. Volume 12, No. 1, July 2015, http://www.mhselfhelp.org. For content, reproduction or publication information, please contact Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org or 800-553-4539 x3812, 267-507-3812 (direct). Follow Susan on Twitter at @SusanRogersMH

 

Monday
Jul272015

The Key Update, Volume 11, Number 12 - June 2015

There’s Still Time to Register for an Exciting Webinar on Criminal Justice Issues on June 25!

Three prominent experts in criminal justice issues will present a free 90-minute webinar on Thursday, June 25, at 2 p.m. ET. Among the topics to be covered by this webinar – which is sponsored by the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse and the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion – will be the movement for social justice whose goal is to cut the incarceration rate in half by 2030 while reducing crime; how to support individuals with mental health conditions who are incarcerated and how to help them transition successfully into the community; and diversion models to prevent or minimize incarceration, including the Nathaniel Project, the first alternative-to-incarceration program in Manhattan Supreme Court for adults with serious mental health conditions convicted of felony offenses. The presenters are Glenn E. Martin, founder and president of JustLeadershipUSA (JLUSA); Dan Abreu, MS CRC LMHC, a senior project associate at Policy Resource Associates; and Ann-Marie Louison, the co-founder of the Nathaniel ProjectFor more information and to register, click here.

 

Stand Up for Human Rights by Signing the Byberry Declaration for Human Rights of Persons with Mental Health Conditions

For half a millennium, individuals with mental health conditions were warehoused in institutions in an unbroken line that stretches from Bedlam (the infamous Bethlem Royal Hospital in London) to Byberry (the name by which the notorious Philadelphia State Hospital was known). June 2015 marks the 25th anniversary of the closure of Byberry. To affirm the Byberry Declaration for Human Rights of Persons with Mental Health Conditions with your signature, click here.

 

Free Manual for Eliminating Barriers for Individuals with Forensic Histories Is Available

The Center for American Progress recently published One Strike and You’re Out: How We Can Eliminate Barriers to Economic Security and Mobility for People with Criminal Records. According to the guide, “One recent study finds that our nation’s poverty rate would have dropped by 20 percent between 1980 and 2004 if not for mass incarceration and the subsequent criminal records that haunt people for years after they have paid their debt to society.” In addition, they write, “people are treated as criminals long after they pose any significant risk of committing further crimes – making it difficult for many to move on with their lives and achieve basic economic security, let alone have a shot at upward mobility.” The guide provides recommendations for increasing opportunities for individuals with criminal records in the areas of employment, housing, public assistance, education and training, and economic security and financial empowerment. The manual is available for free download by clicking here.

 

Study Seeks Participants Who Have Experienced Hospitalization in Acute Psychiatric Units

Harvard University researchers are seeking a better understanding of important factors that influence staff and service-user satisfaction within acute psychiatric wards. Co-investigator Morgan Shields, a student at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, writes: “If you have experienced being a patient within an acute psychiatric unit, I would appreciate it if you would participate in a series of questionnaires available by clicking here. The questionnaires will take about 20 minutes to complete….Participants will be entered into a raffle to win a $25 gift certificate. All responses will be kept anonymous.” Participants in the Boston area may be contacted for a follow-up interview, but participation in such an interview is not required. The deadline for the study, which is being conducted under the auspices of Massachusetts General Hospital, is September 15, 2015. Questions? Please contact Morgan Shields at Morgan.Shields@mail.harvard.edu.

 

“Career Services Guide” Is Offered to Help Employment Counselors Assist People with Mental Health Issues

The Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counseling (CERIC) is offering a free guide intended for career service workers, employment counselors and career practitioners working in non-mental-health-specific employment settings. CERIC writes that the guide “builds on emerging ‘best practices’ in employment support, recovery-oriented practices, and draws on the wisdom of experts in the field of career counselling and the ‘experiential expertise’ of people who access counselling services. Featuring five chapters, the guide, along with supporting videos, will help practitioners to consider beliefs that may limit opportunity, build awareness of recovery-oriented practices, and acquire the skills needed to better serve the one in five … who experience mental health issues.” For more information, click here. To download the free guide, click here.

Thanks, Leah Harris

 

Writers’ Colony Offers Fellowship for a Nonfiction Project on Mental Health Issues

The Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, is offering a fellowship to an emerging or established writer working on a nonfiction project concentrating on mental health issues, focusing particularly on recovery from, and reconstructing aspects of a healthy life while living with, mental health challenges. The Fellowship entitles the recipient to a two-week stay at the Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow. Each resident has a private suite with writing space, private bath, bedroom and wireless Internet. The residency provides uninterrupted writing time, with dinner prepared and served five nights a week, and breakfast and lunch supplies available. Residents also share the camaraderie of other professional writers and artists when they want it. Fellowship applications, which must be accompanied by two references and a non-refundable $35 application fee, must be postmarked by July 31, 2015. Click here to apply online. The recipient will be announced in early September. Residencies must be completed by July 31, 2016. For more information, please contact Jill Slane at (479) 244-6054.

 

Hearing Is Held on the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act (HR 2646)

On June 16, 2015, the House Energy and Commerce Committee held a hearing on HR 2646, the 2015 version of the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act, sponsored by Rep. Tim Murphy, who introduced an earlier version in 2013 (HR 3717). Among those who testified were Virginia State Senator Creigh Deeds, former U.S. Rep. Patrick Kennedy, Mental Health America president Paul Gionfriddo,  and New York Association of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services executive director Harvey Rosenthal. The archived hearing, along with links to everyone’s written testimony, is available online. The bill, available here, would have a major impact on individuals with mental health conditions, and it is important to keep abreast of developments. Among those who have commented (including outside of the hearing) are the Bazelon Center (click here), former Rep. Patrick Kennedy (click here) and the National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery (click here). 

Thanks, Jeremy Countryman

 

ProPublica Invites You to Steal Their Stories. No, Really! 

ProPublica, an award-winning source of “Journalism in the Public Interest,” writes that, “Unless otherwise noted, you can republish our articles and graphics for free.” It’s true that there are a few hoops to jump through and a few restrictions. For example, they write, “You have to credit us — ideally in the byline. We prefer ‘Author Name, ProPublica.’” Also, “if you’re republishing online, you have to link to us and to include all of the links from our story, as well as our PixelPing tag.” And “you cannot republish our photographs or illustrations without specific permission (ask our Communications Director Nicole Collins Bronzan if you’d like to).” But it’s still a very generous offer! The rules are available here.

 

“A Good Hire” Helps Individuals with Felony Convictions Seeking Employment

A Good Hire: Resources for Finding Undiscovered Talent – a project of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area and the National Employment Law Project – writes: “This is part of a public education campaign to raise awareness among hiring decision-makers about the untapped talent that is overlooked when employers screen out people with past records of arrests or convictions. A Good Hire provides information about ‘fair chance’ hiring practices that will help employers reach this untapped pool of talent. A Good Hire is one part of a larger effort to engage the employer community as a means of affecting the overarching economic environment in which people with records are struggling to succeed.” For more information, please contact A Good Hire at info@agoodhire.com.

 

New Publication on Trauma-Informed Care for Youth and Young Adults Is Available

Pathways Research and Training Center at Portland State University in Oregon has published Trauma-Informed Care, a 40-page magazine with a variety of articles focusing on “Youth, Young Adults and Mental Health.” “It is estimated that nearly half of all youth in the United States have been exposed to at least one adverse childhood experience, and that the occurrence of multiple trauma exposures is common within specific populations,” the Introduction notes. Among the articles are “The Impact of Toxic Stress on the Developing Person: Becoming a Trauma-Informed Service Provider,” “Through a Darker Lens: The Trauma of Racism in Communities of Color,” “Trauma Informed Method of Engagement (TIME) for Youth Advocacy,” and “SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach in Youth Settings.” The publication is available for free download by clicking here.

 

National Survey Provides Comprehensive Look at Employment of Individuals with Disabilities

On June 3, 2015, the Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire (UNH) unveiled the results of the Kessler Foundation 2015 National Employment and Disability Survey on Capitol Hill. The survey, which was conducted by UNH, identifies strategies that Americans with disabilities use to search for work and navigate barriers, accommodations that are helpful to obtain and maintain employment, and factors that contribute to unemployment. According to the Kessler Foundation website, this is “the first national survey to examine the workplace experiences of people with disabilities and identify successful strategies that people with disabilities have used to find and maintain employment….The survey revealed that more than 68 percent of people with disabilities are striving to work….Importantly, Americans with disabilities are also overcoming barriers to employment, such as not enough education or training, employers assuming that they cannot do the job, lack of transportation, and family discouragement.” For more information, click here. The executive summary is available here; the full report is available here. More than 3,000 individuals with disabilities nationwide were surveyed between October 2014 and April 2015, according to an article in The New York Times, available here.

 

Facebook Group Established to Honor Late Leaders of the C/S/X Movement for Social Justice

A public Facebook group has been created to commemorate leaders of the c/s/x movement for social justice who have died. The group, Standing on the Shoulders of Giants, was created by Jennifer Constantine, executive director of South Dakota United for Hope and Recovery, South Dakota’s statewide peer-run organization. She writes, “This is meant to be a place to honor the memory of those who have passed, and to share the wisdom we gained through connection with them.” The group, which is open to everyone, is available at this link.

 

AP Stylebook Adopts New Guidelines for Writing about Suicide

The Associated Press stylebook, which many consider the journalist’s bible, has issued new rules for covering suicide. The new guidelines ban the phrase “committed suicide” in favor of using “killed himself, took her own life or died by suicide.” The guidelines note that “generally, AP does not cover suicides or suicide attempts, unless the person involved is a well-known figure or the circumstances are particular unusual or publicly disruptive. Suicide stories, when written, should not go into detail on methods used….” The guidelines have garnered some criticism: One blogger wrote that “the policy of not covering suicides codifies an ongoing and puzzling refusal by news media to deal with suicide as a health and education issue in the belief that to mention a suicide, the second-leading cause of death of Minnesota young people, is to encourage more suicides.” However, the revisions have been embraced by the American Copy Editors Society, whose president noted, “These changes to the Stylebook are a good reminder that editors of all kinds need to keep sensitivity at the top of the editing checklist.”

 

Next National Technical Assistance and Networking Teleconference Will Be Held on July 20

On Monday, July 20, 2015 – at 1 p.m. ET, noon CT, 11 a.m. MT, 10 a.m. PT, 7 a.m. in Hawaii – the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse will host its monthly one-hour national technical assistance and networking teleconference. The call-in number is 866-906-0123; the pass code is 5037195#. If you plan to participate, it would be helpful if you would email Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org; this will make it easier to provide the participants with teleconference minutes. Thanks! If you would like a copy of any of the available minutes, please write to srogers@mhasp.org with the word “Minutes” in the subject line. (The calls are held on the third Monday of the month except when that is a holiday, such as in January and February, in which case they are held on the fourth Monday.) Join us on July 20 at 1 p.m. ET! Again, the call-in number is 866-906-0123. The passcode is 5037195.

 

Consumer-Driven Services Directory

The Clearinghouse welcomes all programs in which consumers play a significant role in leadership and operation to apply for inclusion in its Directory of Consumer-Driven Services. The directory, accessible athttp://www.cdsdirectory.org, is searchable by location, type of organization, and targeted clientele, and serves as a free resource for consumers, program administrators and researchers. Apply online athttp://www.cdsdirectory.org/database/cds.php, via fax at 215-636-6312, or by phone at 800-553-4KEY (4539). To receive an application by mail, write to info@cdsdirectory.org or NMHCSH Clearinghouse, 1211 Chestnut Street, Suite 1100, Philadelphia, PA 19107.

 

About The Key Update

The Key Update is the free monthly e-newsletter of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse. Volume 11, No. 12, June 2015, http://www.mhselfhelp.org. For content, reproduction or publication information, please contact Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org or 800-553-4539 x3812, 267-507-3812 (direct). Follow Susan on Twitter at @SusanRogersMH

Friday
May292015

The Key Update, Volume 11, Number 11 - May 2015

Join Us on June 25 for an Exciting Webinar on Criminal Justice Issues!

Three prominent experts in criminal justice issues will present a free 90-minute webinar on Thursday, June 25, at 2 p.m. ET. Among the topics to be covered by this webinar – which is sponsored by the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse and the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion – will be the movement for social justice whose goal is to cut the incarceration rate in half by 2030 while reducing crime; how to support individuals with mental health conditions who are incarcerated and how to help them transition successfully into the community; and diversion models to prevent or minimize incarceration, including the Nathaniel Project, the first alternative-to-incarceration program in Manhattan Supreme Court for adults with serious mental health conditions convicted of felony offenses. The presenters are Glenn E. Martin, founder and president of JustLeadershipUSA (JLUSA); Dan Abreu, MS CRC LMHC, a senior project associate at Policy Resource Associates; and Ann-Marie Louison, the co-founder of the Nathaniel Project. For more information and to register, click here.

 

You Have Until June 15 to Submit a Workshop Proposal for Alternatives 2015!

The deadline to submit a workshop proposal for Alternatives 2015, the 29th annual national mental health conference organized by and for mental health consumers/survivors and funded in part by SAMHSA, has been extended for two weeks, until June 15! This year’s conference, organized by Peerlink National Technical Assistance Center, will be held in Memphis, Tennessee, Oct. 14-18, 2015. The conference theme is “Believe in Ourselves. Believe in Our Culture. Believe in Alternatives.” To submit a proposal, click here. For more information about the conference, click here.

 

SAMHSA Launches Free Webinar Series on Mental Illness Prevention, Treatment, and Recovery Strategies

SAMHSA’s four new webinar series, jointly “Addressing Serious Mental Illness (SMI): Effective Prevention, Treatment and Recovery Strategies,” will be delivered from May through August 2015 by the partners in the Mental Health Block Grant Coalition, developed and sponsored by SAMHSA. Each series will describe new and emerging practices across a variety of mental health services, and will explore the types of outcomes sought for different approaches, how these approaches are financed, and provide state and local examples. The Peer Webinar Series will focus on peer related issues such as a recovery oriented workforce, strategies for effective supervision, crisis service providers, and the varying roles of peers. The Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Webinar Series will focus on how the mental health community can help with transition plans for the new HCBS regulations and implementing self-directed care. The Children's Webinar Series will focus on children’s related issues such as evidence-based practices and early interventions for children with SMI, expanding first episode psychosis programs and organizational approaches to effective trauma-informed services. The Criminal Justice Webinar Series will focus on issues including forensic assertive community treatment, addressing the needs of people with SMI, and strengthening partnerships with county jails and community service providers.

 

Three Important Reports on Criminal Justice Issues Are Available for Free Download

Three essential reports on criminal justice issues – covering the broken and inhumane criminal justice system and offering some solutions – were published this month. Human Rights Watch’s 127-page report, “Callous and Cruel: Use of Force against Inmates with Mental Disabilities in US Jails and Prisons,” “details incidents in which correctional staff have deluged prisoners with painful chemical sprays, shocked them with powerful electric stun weapons, and strapped them for days in restraining chairs or beds. Staff have broken prisoners’ jaws, noses, ribs; left them with lacerations requiring stitches, second-degree burns, deep bruises, and damaged internal organs. In some cases, the force used has led to their death.” To download the report, click here. The “Final Report of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing,” which grew out of an Executive Order by President Obama, was published on May 18. “The task force members sought expertise from stakeholders and input from the public as they worked to identify best practices and make recommendations to the President.” The report, more than 100 pages, is available at this link. At the same time, the Vera Institute has published a report entitled “Solitary Confinement: Common Misconceptions and Emerging Safe Alternatives,” available at this link.

 

Results of a National Survey of Certified Peer Specialists: Job Titles and Job Descriptions

The Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion surveyed 275 Certified Peer Specialists in paid CPS positions across the country, and created a document covering the wide variety of job titles that CPS staff work under, and the varied descriptions – in the CPS respondents’ own words – of their job roles and responsibilities. To download the free 44-page document, click here.

 

New York Times Supports Transgender Individuals by Publishing Their Stories Online

The New York Times, which has been running a series of editorials promoting transgender rights and equality, now invites transgender Individuals to submit their stories to its website. “…We are featuring personal stories that reflect the strength, diversity and challenges of the community. Welcome to this evolving collection,” the Times writes. The stories, along with an invitation to participate, are available at this link. In a related story, published by ThinkProgress, a study has found that allowing transgender youth to transition improves their mental health. “This study adds to the growing research showing that affirming transgender identities at a young age yields positive results,” according to the article, available here.

 

Input Is Requested for Peer Support Specialist Wage and Salary Survey

A wage and salary survey for peer support specialists is being conducted in collaboration with a number of peer organizations, including the New York Association of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services (NYAPRS), the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA), the International Association of Peer Supporters (iNAPS), and others. “The goal of this survey,” writes Allen S. Daniels, Ed.D., “is to gather timely information that will help inform and support the peer support specialist workforce on issues related to wages and salaries. All individual responses provided will be confidential. Summary information will be open and available for distribution and use, and is intended for the promotion of improved compensation for peer support specialists. There are two versions of this survey: One for individuals who are employed as peer specialists (available here) and one for organizations that employ peer specialists (available here). Please help distribute this announcement to anyone or any organizations that can complete this survey. The deadline for completion is June 26, 2015.” Questions? Write to Allen Daniels at allensdaniels@gmail.com.

 

Disability Visibility Project’s Social Media Campaign Celebrates 25th Anniversary of the ADA

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, on July 26, 2015, the Disability Visibility Project is partnering with the National Council on Independent Living for the #OurADAStories social media campaign. Its purpose is “to celebrate the rich diversity of the disability community and the impact of the ADA on our everyday lives and activities.” To participate, submit a photo or message from now to July 26, 2015. For information about what to consider when thinking about your ADA story, click here. The Disability Visibility Project also offers these instructions: 1) Tweet your story: It can be a written message, selfie or a photo of things you see in your community that relates to disability rights. Use the hashtags #OurADAStories and#ADA25 in any tweets. Follow @DisVisibility for updates. 2) Post an image or written message to the Disability Visibility Project’s Facebook group (you have to join first). If you do this, include a written description of your image. Questions? Email Alice Wong: alicat155@gmail.com

 

Your Views Are Sought on a Proposed International Peer Leadership Academy

The International Initiative for Mental Health Leadership and Mind Australia are supporting the development of a proposal for an International Peer Leadership Academy, to be based at Yale University and collaborating centers in other countries. Its purpose will be to train and support emerging and established peer leaders in mental health, from low-income and high-income countries, to advocate or manage system transformation from a lived experience perspective. The group, which includes internationally known peer leaders from the U.S., Australia, Canada, England, Scotland and New Zealand, is “seeking the views of people who are involved in mental health systems in any role on the proposed Academy. Your answers will help to inform the proposal we take to funders and customers in time for the Academy to start in 2016. Please pass this survey on to anyone anywhere who has an interest in mental health peer leadership.” The survey deadline is June 20, 2015. To participate, click here.

 

Drucker Institute Invites Applications for 2015 Award for Nonprofit Innovation

The Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University is accepting applications for the 2015 Peter F. Drucker Award for Nonprofit Innovation, which recognizes a nonprofit organization that best demonstrates Peter Drucker's definition of innovation as “change that creates a new dimension of performance.” The award, which includes an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000, recognizes an existing program that has made a difference in the lives of the people it serves, and is granted to the 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that best demonstrates innovation. The deadline is July 1, 2015. For complete program guidelines, application instructions, and information about winners from previous years, click here.

Thanks, Matt Canuteson

 

Webcast on Preventing Death by Suicide: Strategies to Help Children, Youth and Families

On June 9, 2015, at 2 p.m. ET, “KSOC-TV will explore principles of a suicide intervention-informed approach to address the prevention of suicide and to facilitate the skill building that is critical to healing, recovery and resilience for children, youth, families, schools and communities impacted by suicide.” The moderator will be Gary Blau, Ph.D., of SAMHSA’s Child, Adolescent and Family Branch. The guests will be Julie Goldstein Grumet, Ph.D., clinical psychologist and director of prevention and practice, Suicide Prevention Resource Center; Ashli Haggard, president, Active Minds at the University of Maryland and president, Active Minds National Student Advisory Committee; and Richard T. McKeon, Ph.D., M.P.H., chief of SAMHSA’s Suicide Prevention Branch. For more information, click here.

 

Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation Sponsors “Ask Me Anything” Employment Series

On Tuesday, June 23, at 2 p.m. ET, the Boston University Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation – as part of its “Ask Me Anything” employment series – is sponsoring an interactive question and answer webinar on “How to Achieve Financial Wellness While Working.” For example, participants can ask about developing a “financial wellness plan.” They can also find out about the services and supports in their community that might help them receive income tax credits while they work, increase income and keep some of their benefits, and save without affecting their benefits, such as through ABLE (Achieving a Better Life Experience) accounts. The expert is Oscar Jimenez-Solomon, a research scientist and research coordinator at the New York State Psychiatric Institute Center of Excellence for Cultural Competence at Columbia University Medical Center. For more information or to register, click here.

 

Three New Fact Sheets on Supported Employment from Bazelon

The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law has published three fact sheets following up on its report entitled Getting to Work: Promoting Employment of People with Mental IllnessGetting to Work discusses the reasons why states should expand supported employment services to increase employment opportunities for individuals with mental health conditions. These fact sheets highlight three key reasons to increase the availability of supported employment, which are discussed in more detail in the report. The first fact sheet, Supported Employment Works!, highlights the effectiveness of the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment. The second, Supported Employment Saves Money, summarizes the cost and funding mechanisms for supported employment services. The third, Supported Employment and Olmstead, explains how expanding access to supported employment services helps states comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Olmstead decision. View Bazelon’s additional employment resources here.

 

Comics and Graphic Novels Raise Awareness of Mental Health Issues

Studies have shown that there is a link between creativity and recovery. Evidence of this link can be found at Broken Frontier’s website, which has reviewed nine comics and graphic novels that raise awareness of mental health issues. Among these are “Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me,” “Ellen Forney’s autobiographical account of living with bipolar disorder”;  “Special Language,” “Emma Mould’s uncompromising and compelling account of the two months she spent in a psychiatric facility in Bath in the summer of 2010”; and “I Don’t Like My Hair Neat #2,” about which the reviewer writes, “Seldom have I seen a better visual definition of the effects of depression than Julia Scheele’s remarkable strip ‘Sinking’ in this striking anthology collection of her comics work.” Missing from this list is Allie Brosh’s remarkable “Hyperbole and a Half: Adventures in Depression, available at this link. For more information, click here.

 

Next National Technical Assistance and Networking Teleconference Will Be Held on June 15

On Monday, June 15, 2015 – at 1 p.m. ET, noon CT, 11 a.m. MT, 10 a.m. PT, 7 a.m. in Hawaii – the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse will host its monthly one-hour national technical assistance and networking teleconference. The call-in number is 866-906-0123; the pass code is 5037195#. The agenda will be announced via eblast. If you plan to participate, it would be helpful if you would email Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org; this will make it easier to provide the participants with teleconference minutes. Thanks! If you would like a copy of any of the available minutes, please write to srogers@mhasp.org with the word “Minutes” in the subject line. (The calls are held on the third Monday of the month except when that is a holiday, such as in January and February, in which case they are held on the fourth Monday.) The minutes for the calls on April 20 and May 18, along with recordings of these calls, will be available soon. Join us on June 15 at 1 p.m. ET! Again, the call-in number is 866-906-0123. The passcode is 5037195.

 

Consumer-Driven Services Directory

The Clearinghouse welcomes all programs in which consumers play a significant role in leadership and operation to apply for inclusion in its Directory of Consumer-Driven Services. The directory, accessible at http://www.cdsdirectory.org, is searchable by location, type of organization, and targeted clientele, and serves as a free resource for consumers, program administrators and researchers. Apply online at http://www.cdsdirectory.org/database/cds.php, via fax at 215-636-6312, or by phone at 800-553-4KEY (4539). To receive an application by mail, write to info@cdsdirectory.org or NMHCSH Clearinghouse, 1211 Chestnut Street, Suite 1100, Philadelphia, PA 19107.

 

About The Key Update

The Key Update is the free monthly e-newsletter of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse. Volume 11, No. 11, May 2015, http://www.mhselfhelp.org. To subscribe, please send a message to: subscribe thekey. To unsubscribe, please send a message to: unsubscribe thekey. For content, reproduction or publication information, please contact Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org or 800-553-4539 x3812, 267-507-3812 (direct). Follow Susan on Twitter at @SusanRogersMH

Friday
May292015

The Key Update, Volume 11, Number 10 - April 2015

The Clearinghouse Will Present a Webinar on Peer Leadership in Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) Services on May 27, 2015

The National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse is hosting a free 90-minute webinar on Peer Leadership in Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) Services: From Program Development to Outcome Evaluation on Wednesday, May 27, 2015, at 2 p.m. ET. While many EIP programs include (or plan to include) some element of peer support and/or family support, questions remain as to how to ensure meaningful peer involvement that significantly impacts services. The presenters – Nev Jones, PhD; Irene Hurford, MD; and Berta Britz, MSW, CPS – will discuss both the real-world challenges of robust peer involvement and the potential for such involvement to transform – rather than merely augment – services across the domains of planning, service delivery, policy, and evaluation. Nev Jones, a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, and Berta Britz, who helped develop and now coordinates the Montgomery County (Pa.) Hearing Voices Network, have lived experience, including of early intervention programs; Irene Hurford is the program director for the Psychosis Education, Assessment, Care, and Empowerment (PEACE) program at Horizon House in Philadelphia. For more information and to register, click here

 

New Resource on Developing Welcoming Religious Communities Is Available for Free Download

A guide to help religious communities connect with individuals who have mental health conditions has been published by the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse in collaboration with the Temple University Collaborative on Community inclusion. Faith communities typically value outreach and inclusion, but may not know how to connect with individuals who have mental health conditions. This new resource offers some valuable direction on the issue. You can access the guide, Developing Welcoming Religious Communities:  Inspiring Examples of Faith-Based Initiatives to Help Individuals with Mental Health Conditions Participate Fully in the Life of Religious Congregations, by clicking here. 

 

SAMHSA Seeks Comments on Core Competencies for Peer Workers by May 5, 2015

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), through the Bringing Recovery Supports to Scale Technical Assistance Center Strategy (BRSS TACS), has developed a draft set of core competencies for peer workers in behavioral health settings and is seeking feedback. SAMHSA writes: “Please review the competencies and provide your comments as appropriate. SAMHSA has also included a general comment box for overall comments on the proposed core competencies.” To read SAMHSA’s frequently asked questions about the core competencies and to comment, click here. The deadline for comments is May 5, 2015. In a related story, to review the International Association of Peer Supporters’ “National Practice Guidelines for Peer Supporters,” click here.

 

May 1 Is the Deadline for Two Opportunities: to Submit a Workshop Proposal for the iNAPS Annual Conference, and to Participate in an Anti-Prejudice Project Organized by NoStigmas

It’s not too late! You can still submit a workshop proposal for the International Association of Peer Supporters (iNAPS) annual conference, to be held August 20-21, 2015, in San Antonio, Texas. But there is no time to lose: Proposals must be postmarked by May 1, 2015. The theme of the conference is Advocacy, Poverty, and Peer Support. To download the application, click here. May 1 is also the date of the @NoStigmas Project for Mental Health Equality. The invitation on the NoStigmas website reads: “Join the movement for mental health equality on May 1st! Across the globe, NoStigmas volunteers will be taking to the streets and social media to share NoStigmas Project cards. Each card has an encouraging message of hope that will inspire a chain reaction of mental health awareness via social media and in the real world.” To sign up, click here.

 

Webinar to Focus on the Zero Suicide Movement; Website Offers Journalists Guidance on Reporting on Suicide

The NAMI STAR Center is hosting a free 90-minute webinar on The Zero Suicide Movement: How Peers and Family Members Can Get Involved on Tuesday, May 19, 2015, at 3 p.m. ET. The presenters – Michael Hogan, PhD, of Hogan Health Solutions; Leah Harris, until recently the director of the National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery; and Julie Goldstein Grumet, PhD, of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center – will highlight new national initiatives, including the Zero Suicide movement, which seeks to make health care safer; and a just-released national report, The Way Forward: Pathways to Hope, Recovery and Wellness with Insights from Lived Experience. For the report, click here. To register for the webinar, click here. In a related story, The Recommendations for Reporting on Suicide website offers guidance to help journalists do a better job of reporting on suicide. According to the website: “Some suicide deaths may be newsworthy. However, the way media covers suicide can influence behavior negatively by contributing to contagion or positively by encouraging help-seeking.” For more information, click here.

 

iNAPS to Host Webinar with Mary Ellen Copeland on May 15, 2015

iNAPS is hosting a free one-hour webinar on May 15, 2015, at 12 p.m. ET; Mary Ellen Copeland of the Copeland Center will present on “Moving Forward with WRAP.” Details will be forthcoming at this link.

 

Youth Issues Are the Focus of a Guide, a Webinar, and a YouTube Video

A guide to help young adults with lived experience of a mental health condition make the transition from being a “youth advocate” to an “advocate for youth” in a professional setting is available at this link. The guide –Youth Advocate to Advocate for Youth: The Next Transition, produced by Youth MOVE National in partnership with the Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures – includes information for the young advocate in transition and for the adults who provide professional development support, as well as a variety of links to additional resources. Pathways RTC is also sponsoring a free one-hour webinar on June 2, 2015, at 1 p.m. ET on Addressing Homelessness among Youth Aging Out of Foster Care: A Social Networks Approach. For more information or to register, click here. In addition, Youth Leaders Unite, created at Alternatives 2011,features youth leaders from some of the nations’ leading youth groups focused on mental health, substance abuse and foster care issues. The video was shown during the Alternatives 2011 youth plenary session, which was led by individuals from a variety of youth mental health advocacy organizations. To watch this powerful five-minute video, click here.

 

Two New Reports on Criminal Justice Issues Are Available for Free Download

The Urban Institute and the Vera Institute of Justice recently published reports on criminal justice issues. The Urban Institute’s report, The Processing and Treatment of Mentally Ill Persons in the Criminal Justice System: A Scan of Practice and Background Analysis, “provides a national landscape on the processing and treatment of mentally ill individuals in the criminal justice system. It also highlights challenges involved in the reintegration of mentally ill offenders into society, the diversity of policies and protocols in state statutes to address such challenges, and promising criminal justice interventions for mentally ill offenders.” For the free report, click here. At the same time, the Vera Institute’s Center on Sentencing and Corrections, in conjunction with the National PREA Resource Center (created under the federal Prison Rape Elimination Act), has developed a new resource for correctional administrators and staff about housing at-risk individuals without the use of isolation. This guide, Keeping Vulnerable Populations Safe Under PREA: Alternative Strategies to the Use of Segregation in Prisons and Jails, “will help agencies comply with the National Standards to Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Prison Rape (PREA Standards), which place limits on the use of segregated housing for at-risk populations and victims of corrections-based sexual abuse. It also includes promising practices for managing the housing of populations at particularly high risk for sexual abuse in confinement: women; youthful inmates in adult facilities; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex (LGBTI) individuals; and people who are gender nonconforming.” For more information, click here. To download the report, click here.
 

Alternatives 2015 to Be Held Oct. 14-18, 2015, in Memphis, Tennessee!

Alternatives 2015, the 29th annual national mental health conference organized by and for mental health consumers/survivors and funded in part by SAMHSA, will be held in Memphis, Tennessee, Oct. 14-18, 2015! The organizers of this year’s conference, Peerlink National Technical Assistance Center, will be sharing additional information, including the call for papers, in the near future. In the meantime, start working on your workshop proposals: There may only be some 14 days between the announcement of the call for papers and the submission deadline! For more information as it becomes available, click here.

 

14 Apps – Many Free – Are Available for Individuals Living with Anxiety

Buzzfeed has compiled 14 apps – many free and others of nominal cost – to help individuals who experience anxiety. Among the free apps are Pacifica, which “lets you rate and track mood over time, and provides guided deep breathing and muscle relaxation exercises, daily anti-anxiety experiments, and health goals.” Breathe2Relax, developed by the National Center for Telehealth & Technology, “guides you through diaphragmatic breathing (or ‘belly breathing’), allows you to record your own stress level, and provides informative videos and graphics about the consequences of stress.” PTSD Coach, from the National Center for PSTD – designed specifically for veterans – “educates users about PTSD and its treatment, offers a self-assessment tool, links users up to support groups, and provides stress management tools.” And MindShift is a “teen-targeted app [that] offers strategies for facing anxieties related to socializing and school, with journaling tools, positive thinking exercises, symptom trackers, and relaxation tips.” Buzzfeed notes that the apps “are not substitutes for professional treatment.” For more information, click here.

 

Organization Offers Free Guide to Inspire Nonprofit Boards

Stand For Your Mission seeks to create positive change through board advocacy and offers a free discussion guide to help. According to its website, http://standforyourmission.org/, “Board members are the community leaders from whom decision-makers need to hear. Board members serve as powerful champions for our missions. We are the ambassadors who can bridge differences in opinion, turn ideas into solutions, and make good things happen. Each of us is deeply committed to our missions. Each of us has what it takes to be an advocate for our missions. As stewards of our organizations, we must find our voice.” To download the free guide, click here.

Thanks, Leah Harris

 

Map Depicts Homelessness in America

Stateline, a Pew Charitable Trusts reporting outlet, has compiled a map “showing how homelessness stacks up in each state.” According to the map, Hawaii has the worst rate of homelessness in the U.S., followed by New York and Nevada. Mississippi, Virginia, and Indiana have some of the lowest rates relative to their overall populations. To see the map, made available by www.vox.comclick here. (Vox notes, “How to deal with homelessness: Give people homes.”) Earlier this month, Vox published a video of homeless people reading mean tweets. The heartbreaking video is available here.

 

Comic Book Features Female Superhero with Bipolar Disorder

Aura, a female superhero who has bipolar disorder, was featured in RISE #2 (Comics Against Bullying) and You Are Not Alone Vol. 2.  And her creators, Marguerite Sauvage and Vasilis Pozios, were nominated for a 2015 PRISM Award. But there is still not enough diversity in the comics industry, according to at least one critic. To read more, click here.

 

May 16 Is International Day of Protest Against ECT

On Saturday, May 16, 2015, there will be demonstrations protesting shock treatment (ECT, or electroconvulsive therapy) in nearly two dozen cities around the world (so far), most of which are in states around the U.S., plus four more in Canada, Scotland, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. Although some believe the benefits of ECT outweigh the risks, the risks of ECT – permanent amnesia and permanent deficits in cognitive abilities – have been confirmed by researchers such as Dr. Harold Sackeim, a well-known proponent of ECT, whose 2007 study in Neuropsychopharmacology concludes: "[T]his study provides the first evidence in a large, prospective sample that adverse cognitive effects can persist for an extended period, and that they characterize routine treatment with ECT in community settings.” In addition, reviews of and information about “Doctors of Deception: What They Don’t Want You to Know about Shock Treatment” areavailable here. For more information about the May 16 event, click here and here and here. If you are interested in organizing or attending such an event, contact may16shockdemo@gmail.com or sources at one of the links above.

 

Criminal Justice Issues for Individuals with Mental Health Conditions Will Be the Focus of a Special Clearinghouse Teleconference on May 18, 2015

On May 18, 2015, at 1 p.m. ET, the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse will host a special one-hour national technical assistance and networking teleconference featuring a presentation on how to support individuals with mental health conditions who are incarcerated and how to help them transition successfully into the community. This will be followed by a discussion. The call – part of the Clearinghouse’s monthly teleconference series – will be on Monday, May 18, 2015, at 1 p.m. ET, noon CT, 11 a.m. MT, 10 a.m. PT, 7 a.m. in Hawaii. The call-in number is 866-906-0123; the pass code is 5037195#. The presenter will be LaVerne Miller, JD, Senior Project Associate at Policy Research Associates, which operates SAMHSA’s National GAINS Center for People with Co-Occurring Disorders in the Justice System.  More information will soon be posted on the Clearinghouse website and we will send an e-blast when it is available.

If you plan to participate, it would be helpful if you would email Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org; this will make it easier to provide the participants with teleconference minutes. Thanks! If you would like a copy of any of the available minutes, please write to srogers@mhasp.org with the word “Minutes” in the subject line. (The calls are held on the third Monday of the month except when that is a holiday, such as in January and February, in which case they are held on the fourth Monday.)

Join us on May 18th at 1 p.m. ET! Again, the call-in number is 866-906-0123. The passcode is 5037195.

 

Consumer-Driven Services Directory

The Clearinghouse welcomes all programs in which consumers play a significant role in leadership and operation to apply for inclusion in its Directory of Consumer-Driven Services. The directory, accessible athttp://www.cdsdirectory.org, is searchable by location, type of organization, and targeted clientele, and serves as a free resource for consumers, program administrators and researchers. Apply online athttp://www.cdsdirectory.org/database/cds.php, via fax at 215-636-6312, or by phone at 800-553-4KEY (4539). To receive an application by mail, write to info@cdsdirectory.org or NMHCSH Clearinghouse, 1211 Chestnut Street, Suite 1100, Philadelphia, PA 19107.

 

About The Key Update

The Key Update is the free monthly e-newsletter of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse. Volume 11, No. 10, April 2015, http://www.mhselfhelp.org.For content, reproduction or publication information, please contact Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org or 800-553-4539 x3812, 267-507-3812 (direct). 

Tuesday
Apr282015

The Key Update, Volume 11, Number 9 - March 2015

#NoModernAsylums: Numerous Rebuttals to Controversial JAMA and NY Times Articles Calling for Return to Asylums

Following the publication of two controversial pieces – in JAMA and The New York Times, respectively – calling for a return to psychiatric asylums, articles and letters flooded the Internet. The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law has devoted a webpage to many of the letters, including a number that were submitted to but not published in the Times. Clearinghouse executive director Joseph Rogers debated Dr. Dominic Sisti, lead author of the JAMA piece, on WHYY’s “Voices in the Family” – to listen to the archived show, click here – and a Mad in America blog reported on the show. (Subsequently, Sisti and Rogers were among the co-authors on aPhiladelphia Inquirer piece seeking common ground.) At the same time, the Twittersphere lit up with posts to #NoModernAsylums. The National Council’s president and CEO, Linda Rosenberg, weighed in: “The [JAMA] piece is dismissive of programs like Fountain House and of psychiatric survivors – the very places and people that taught us recovery is possible and should be expected.”

 

British Guide to “Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia” Is Available for Free Download

The British Psychological Society has published a guide entitled “Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia.” Its subtitle is “Why people sometimes hear voices, believe things that others find strange, or appear out of touch with reality, and what can help.” The authors write, “We hope that this report will contribute to a fundamental change that is already underway in how we as a society think about and offer help for ‘psychosis’ and ‘schizophrenia.’ ” With subheads such as “Everyone’s experiences are different,” “Many ‘normal’ people have unusual experiences,” and “Are mental health diagnoses meaningful? Do they refer to real ‘things’?,” this guide is enlightening. To download it for free, click here.

Thanks, Leah Harris

 

Newsletter Focuses on How to Help Individuals with Mental Health Issues Who Have Been Incarcerated Rejoin Society

RECOVER-e Works, an electronic newsletter of the Coalition of Behavioral Health Agencies’ Center for Rehabilitation and Recovery, devoted its February 2015 edition to the intersection of forensic and mental health issues.” The issue includes “the case for integrating formerly incarcerated peers (people with a psychiatric diagnosis) into society, what providers can do to facilitate that process, and a few resources to help them.” The resources include how individuals who have been incarcerated can protect themselves from employment discrimination, how to gather evidence of rehabilitation, and more. To download a free copy, click here.

 

3 FAQs from People with Disabilities About Their Taxes

A blog on the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work website answers three questions of importance to individuals with disabilities: Are my disability benefits taxable?Do I need to report an Earned Income Tax Credit payment to Social Security?, and Do I need to report income tax refunds to Social Security? For the answers, click here.

Thanks, Transitions RTC

 

March 31 Is the Deadline for Two Important Opportunities

The deadline to apply to present a workshop at the NARPA (National Association for Rights Protection and Advocacy) conference – to be held August 20-23, 2015, at the Embassy Suites Washington, DC, Convention Center – has been extended to March 31. For more information, click here. And Mental Health America 2015 awards nominations, including for the Clifford W. Beers Award, are also due by March 31. All award recipients will be honored during events held at Mental Health America’s 2015 Annual Conference, June 3-5, 2015, in Alexandria, Virginia, at the Hilton Mark Center. For more information, click here.

 

SAMHSA Extends Deadline for Voice Awards Nominations to April 10

SAMHSA’s Voice Awards program “honors consumer/peer leaders and television and film professionals who educate the public about behavioral health. Through their work and personal stories of resilience, both groups of leaders demonstrate that people with mental and/or substance use disorders can and do recover and lead meaningful lives.” To nominate a consumer/peer leader click here. To nominate a television or film productionclick here.

 

May 16 Is International Day of Protest Against ECT

On Saturday, May 16, 2015, there will be demonstrations protesting shock treatment (ECT, or electroconvulsive therapy) in nearly two dozen cities around the world (so far), most of which are in states around the U.S., plus four more in Canada, Scotland, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. Although some believe the benefits of ECT outweigh the risks, the risks of ECT – permanent amnesia and permanent deficits in cognitive abilities –have been confirmed by researchers such as Dr. Harold Sackeim, a well-known proponent of ECT, whose 2007 study in Neuropsychopharmacology concludes: "[T]his study provides the first evidence in a large, prospective sample that adverse cognitive effects can persist for an extended period, and that they characterize routine treatment with ECT in community settings.” In addition, reviews of and information about “Doctors of Deception: What They Don’t Want You to Know about Shock Treatment” are available here. For more information about the May 16 event, click here and here and here. If you are interested in organizing such an event, contact may16shockdemo@gmail.com or sources at one of the links above.

 

Two Free Webinars on Advocacy Will Be Hosted by BoardSource in Early April

BoardSource, which describes itself as “the only national organization focused exclusively on nonprofit governance,” writes: “… BoardSource and the Alliance for Justice invite you to join us for a series of free webinars on advocacy. In webinar #1, we’ll discuss what advocacy is – it’s much more than lobbying – and how it can help public charities accomplish their goals.” “Making the Case” Why Advocacy by Nonprofits Is So Important,” will take place on April 2, 2015 at 2 p.m. ET. Then, on April 9 at 2 p.m. ET, BoardSource will present “You CAN Advocate: Overview of the Legal Rules.” “Contrary to popular myth, 501(c)(3) public charities can lobby,” BoardSource writes. “In this webinar … we’ll provide an overview of what counts as lobbying…and how much you can legally do.” To register for one of these BoardSource webinars and to get information about their other webinars as well as other resources, Google BoardSource.

 

“Recovery Is Breaking Through,” Says New Café TA Center Publication

“While the concept of recovery has more and more become a permanent fixture in the mental health world, it has yet to gain similar traction among the general public. However, the process of introducing the larger population to mental health recovery is happening now, with different groups working on multiple fronts to move recovery into the mainstream,” according to the latest edition of the Café TA Center’s free publication, “Focus.” “The consequences of these efforts have the potential to determine the shape of the mental health system for years to come.” To download the free publication, click here.   

 

Free Webinar on Motivational Interviewing for Peer Support Providers

The National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery is hosting a free webinar on “Motivational Interviewing for Peer Support Providers” on April 9, 2015, from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ET. Motivational interviewing is “designed to strengthen an individual’s motivation for and movement toward a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person’s own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion.” To register for the webinar, click here.

 

“Say It Out Loud” Campaign Addresses Depression in Teens

NAMI has launched a campaign to “get teens talking about mental health.” More than half of teens who have a mental health condition are not getting the help they need, according to NAMI’s Say It Out Loud web page. Citing prejudice as a major barrier to teens getting needed help, NAMI writes, “Raising awareness by sharing information and starting conversations about mental health is key in reducing these [negative] perceptions and increasing the likelihood that teens will seek mental health care when they need it.” NAMI’s “Say It Out Loud” web page offers links to a toolkit to help adults talk to faith-based or community youth groups about mental health issues. For links to the toolkit and other information, click here.

 

Second Annual Mental Health & Dignity Day to Take Place May 3, 2015

The second annual national Mental Health & Dignity Day is being planned for the first Sunday in May, May 3, 2015, in part as a way to commemorate Mental Health Month. On their Facebook page, the organizers write, “Help us to set the agenda for 2015 by providing input on what issues you think are most important as it relates to mental health, dignity, human rights, that can be addressed at our events. Are you interested in seeing an event happen in your community? Would you like to recognize National Mental Health & Dignity [Day] as a part of your existing activities in May? Get in touch with us; we would love to ‘hear’ from you!” The Facebook page is available here.

 

Are You a Journalist or Do You Know One Who Might Be Interested? Applications for Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellowships Are Due by April 17

“As part of an international effort to reduce stigma and discrimination, The Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism provide stipends to journalists ... to increase accurate reporting on mental health issues and decrease incorrect, stereotypical information; help journalists produce high-quality work that reflects an understanding of mental health issues through exposure to well-established resources in the field; and develop a cadre of better-informed print and electronic journalists who will more accurately report information through newspapers, magazines, radio, television, film, and online and social media, influencing their peers to do the same.” Applications should be submitted no later than April 17, 2015. To apply, click here.

 

Strange But True: “Psychoanalysis” Comics from the 1950s

“Psychoanalysis,” which only lasted for four issues, was published by Entertaining Comics in 1955. It was approved by the Comics Code Authority, “but newsstands were reluctant to display it,” according to a blog in the UK. “The comic featured three patients, Freddy Carter, Ellen Lyman and Mark Stone, who were undergoing psychoanalysis. The analyst was the central character. He was never named, simply listed as The Psychiatrist. Ellen Lyman did not appear in the fourth and final issue, having been cured in the third issue,” the blog reports. To view the comics for free online, click here.

Thanks, Keris Myrick

 

Special National TA and Networking Teleconference on April 20 Will Feature a Presentation on Career Development for CPS

The next monthly national technical assistance and networking teleconference of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse will be on Monday, April 20, 2015, at 1 p.m. ET, noon CT, 11 a.m. MT, 10 a.m. PT, 7 a.m. in Hawaii. The call-in number is 866-906-0123; the pass code is 5037195#. It will feature a presentation on career development for certified peer specialists followed by a discussion. Thousands of trained and certified behavioral health peer workers are now employed across the country in most states with Medicaid reimbursement.  Efforts are also underway to develop national peer worker standards. As this new peer workforce grows, it’s essential to identify and create peer career development and promotion opportunities so that certified peer workers earn salaries consistent with their skills and are able to move ahead in their careers. Accomplishing this will require numerous strategies, including enabling certified peer workers to obtain academic credit and educational credentials. During our April 20th call, Jessica Wolf, founder of the Facebook Group “Education Pays! Peer Career Development,” will facilitate a discussion on individual and systemic peer career development strategies. We hope you will join us!

The presenter, Jessica Wolf, Ph.D., is principal of Decision Solutions, a behavioral health workforce consulting practice emphasizing peer education, training, and employment. She is also an assistant clinical professor in the Yale University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry. Her extensive administrative and educational experience includes 16 years as coordinator of the Housatonic Community College MERGE Mental Health Certificate Program. She has personal and family experience of mental health conditions.

If you plan to participate, it would be helpful if you would email Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org; this will make it easier to provide the participants with teleconference minutes. Thanks! If you would like a copy of any of the available minutes, please write to srogers@mhasp.org with the word “Minutes” in the subject line. (The calls are held on the third Monday of the month except when that is a holiday, such as in January and February, in which case they are held on the fourth Monday.)

 

Consumer-Driven Services Directory

The Clearinghouse welcomes all programs in which consumers play a significant role in leadership and operation to apply for inclusion in its Directory of Consumer-Driven Services. The directory, accessible athttp://www.cdsdirectory.org, is searchable by location, type of organization, and targeted clientele, and serves as a free resource for consumers, program administrators and researchers. Apply online athttp://www.cdsdirectory.org/database/cds.php, via fax at 215-636-6312, or by phone at 800-553-4KEY (4539). To receive an application by mail, write to info@cdsdirectory.org or NMHCSH Clearinghouse, 1211 Chestnut Street, Suite 1100, Philadelphia, PA 19107.

 

About The Key Update

The Key Update is the free monthly e-newsletter of the National Mental Health Consumers’ Self-Help Clearinghouse. Volume 11, No. 9, March 2015, http://www.mhselfhelp.org. For content, reproduction or publication information, please contact Susan Rogers at srogers@mhasp.org or 800-553-4539 x3812, 267-507-3812 (direct).